Questions & Answers

What is the correct way to brush my teeth?

What is the correct way to brush my teeth?

Regular, thorough brushing is a very important step in preventing tooth decay and gum disease. Brushing removes the bacteria that promote tooth decay and the plaque that can cause gum disease.

Ideally, you should brush after every meal, because the bacterial attack on teeth begins minutes after eating. At the very least, brush once a day and always before you go to bed. Brushing your teeth isn't complicated, but there is a right and a wrong way.

Steps:

  1. Brush at a 45 degree angle to your teeth. Direct the bristles to where your gums and teeth meet. Use a gentle, circular, massaging motion, up and down. Don't scrub. Gums that recede visibly are often a result of years of brushing too hard.
  2. Clean every surface of every tooth. The chewing surface, the cheek side, and the tongue side.
  3. Don't rush your brush. A thorough brushing should take at least two to three minutes. Try timing yourself.
  4. Change your usual brushing pattern. Most people brush their teeth the same way all the time. That means they miss the same spots all the time. Try reversing your usual pattern.

Use a soft brush with rounded bristles. The right toothbrush cleans better. Choose a size and shape that allow you to reach all the way to your back teeth. There are many different types of brushes, so ask your dentist to suggest the best one for you. CDA recommends you replace your toothbrush every three months.

How do I remove stains from my teeth?

How do I remove stains from my teeth?

In most cases, the natural colour of teeth is within a range of light greyish-yellow shades. Teeth naturally darken with age and their appearance can be affected by the accumulation of surface stains acquired from the use of tobacco products and the consumption of certain foods or drinks.

In addition, the perception of the colour of teeth is severely affected by skin tone and make-up. Independent of the real colour of their teeth, people with darker skin or who use dark makeup will look like they have brighter teeth.

Although teeth are not naturally meant to be completely white, many Canadians want a brighter smile. Responding to this desire, a wide range of "whitening" options has become available to consumers. These products fall into two main categories: surface whiteners and bleaches. Our staff at Avalon Dental are fully trained in one hour "zoom" bleaching. Alternately we can supply everything necessary for "at home" bleaching.

How often should I visit the dentist?

How often should I visit the dentist?

How often you go for a check-up depends on your oral health needs. The goal is to catch small problems early. For many people, this means a check-up every six months. Your dentist may suggest that you visit more or less often depending on how well you care for your teeth and gums, problems you have that need to be checked or treated, how fast tartar builds up on your teeth, and so on.

Ask yourself the following questions:

The answers to these questions are all factors that affect your oral and general health. They will help you and your dentist decide how often you need to visit for check-ups. It's worth noting that you should not determine your need for dental care on what your dental plan covers.

At what age should my child start seeing a dentist?

At what age should my child start seeing a dentist?

The Canadian Dental Association encourages the assessment of infants, by a dentist, within 6 months of the eruption of the first tooth or by one year of age. The goal is to have your child visit the dentist before there is a problem with his or her teeth. In most cases, a check up every six months will let your child's dentist catch small problems early. Your child needs to see the dentist by age two or three, when all the baby teeth have come in.

What can I expect during my first visit?

What can I expect during my first visit?

During your check up, your dentist will first conduct an exam. He or she will look for signs of any health issues as they can relate to overall oral health. Your dentist will also look for gum disease, cavities, eroded fillings, tooth fractures, and oral infections. He or she is trained to catch small problems before they become big ones, and can often treat a problem right away.

A check up can include some or all of the following procedures:

  1. Dental and medical history update — your dentist will ask you about any oral or general health problems you have (e.g. changes in your teeth, sensitive gums, allergies, medical conditions)
  2. Examination and treatment — your dentist looks for anything unusual and catches small problems before they become big ones (e.g. early signs of gum disease, eroded fillings, infections, oral cancer). Many small problems can be caught before they become significant and can often be treated right away.
  3. Cleaning — a cleaning makes your teeth and fillings smooth, so it's harder for plaque to build up on your teeth. Plaque is clear and sticky. It forms on your teeth every day. If plaque is left on your teeth, it hardens into tartar (also called calculus). A cleaning is the only way to remove tartar. It cannot be removed with your toothbrush. If tartar is not removed, it can help cause gum disease. A cleaning also removes some stains, so your teeth look better.

Going to the dentist makes me nervous. How can you help?

Going to the dentist makes me nervous. How can you help?

Oral health care is a personalized service that requires a good relationship between you and your dentist and dental hygenist. If you have a concern about the dental treatment you receive, your dentist would want to know about it.

Your first step is to talk to your dentist and explain your concerns or fears. Your dentist is trained and licensed to provide you with oral health care in a safe and ethical manner and will address any questions you may have about the treatment plan set out for you.

Are you able to accommodate patients with disabilities?

Are you able to accommodate patients with disabilities?

Special assistance is available. Whether it is disabled needs or access to the children’s hospital for sedation, Avalon Dental Centre can help. We have disabled parking available underground to avoid adverse weather conditions. Elevators are available throughout the mall and there is wheel chair access. We also have access to the operating room at the local children’s hospital, accommodating children up to age 15.

What are my payment options?

What are my payment options?

Generally payment is due at the time of service. Avalon Dental Centre will accept assignment from Dental Insurance Carriers to assist you, with this. Upon occasion we may accept post dated checks for extensive care, may we ask you to discuss this with our staff. Overdue accounts are charged interest.